Wednesday, 21 December 2005

Skincare for the careless

You can always tell when an ad isn’t meant for you. There’s one at the moment for some product from the Nivea Visage (visage, not visâge, btw: light, cheerful ‘a’, not dark, ominous ‘â’) range where a woman says, in one of those raucous voices, “You’ve had a juicy past and the future looks even brighter.”

The word ‘juicy’ makes me uneasy. They’re obviously addressing ladettes. Are they saying that Nivea Visage will repair any damage done to the skin by endless drinks and fags so do carry on with your unhealthy lifestyle, dears? Or are they advocating promiscuity? (If there is such a thing as promiscuity these days.)

I’m not sure I understand the meaning of that ad. As I get older the number of those ads increases and so does my puzzlement.

I feel I should slap Nivea for delivering an ambiguous, potentially dangerous message and for making me feel so out of touch with what’s going on. Slap!

19 comments:

  1. LOL - I am frequently puzzled by adverts these days - i'm not sure exactly who they're aimed at, but i'm definitely not it. Instead of the 'man without a country', i feel like a 'woman without a demographic'.

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  2. i liked what i think were anti-smoking ads from a few years back that showed pictures of a tub of beautiful white creamy moisturiser with a stubbed out fag next to it

    got the message across well, i thought, and no doubt it too was aimed at ladette types (i.e. what's the point on spending money on beauty products when you are abusing your body by inhaling tobacco)

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  3. I hate that advert too, for the first time I am approaching the age of the target consumer, and my past has been distinctly UNjuicy having met my life partner at the age of 18.

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  4. That's it, D! So am I, really, because I can't identify with my so-called 'demographic' either and I've railed against the ads obviously aimed at me. They keep telling us people are staying younger longer these days but it doesn't seem to be reflected in ads. Oh, I feel forlorn now.

    I liked that ad too, UC: the message was subtle but very clear. The new one is not. I just think that type of behaviour has become more acceptable now, which is depressing: equality didn't mean taking on the worst of men's habits.

    H, my past couldn't have been more unjuicy, but, judging by what ladettes get up to and what they look like while doing it, I certainly don't regret not being the target consumer.

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  5. Yes, juicy past
    As in a lifestyle ripe with sin and seduction, to be bitten into letting the juices run down your face and on to your shirt front (but oh, you probably aren't wearing one).

    Yes, they are saying
    enjoy the ripeness of your fruit without regret, we will be here to clean up your mess

    I'm not sure if you should slap or thank them? Terrible I know.

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  6. Slap'em. They can't deliver on the promise. Whatever-the-heck-it-is-that-they-are-promising.

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  7. It's great, isn't it - sin as much as you like and then apply this face cream and you will be cleansed.

    Now what does that remind me of...?

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  8. well, the marketers have a bit of a conundrum don't they? here we have all these women who just refuse to stay in the place they try to put us! I don't fit the demographic either. So many of us don't.

    They are still trying to shove us in the old box but so many of us are realizing that we're not old and unattractive just because we're over 30, or over 40, or over 50, or anything. I try to ignore all the marketing-it vile.

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  9. Juicy. I sort of loathe that word: juicy. Unless you're referring to tangerines, it just sounds appalling. The equation of youthfulness and vigor with some kind of moisture reminds me of the name "Youth Dew", a name I've always found sort of unpleasant.

    What in the world is a ladette?

    At any rate, I would bet that *most* ads aren't meant for me, since I never watch TV and when I do, the shows I turn on always seem to have advertisements for hair-growth therapies, impotence pills, and electric razors, all of which are irrelevant to my lifestyle, and which seem to go along with my recent discovery that I'm secretly a man, at least according to the judgment of a 1970s psychologist. (See my blog for explanation.)

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  10. A ladette is a phenomenon from the 90s onwards, and is a young woman who takes on the worst raucous behaviour that used to be the province of young men and revels in her 'equality'. She'll be rolling drunk, on pints of lager rather than girly drinks, at least every Friday and Saturday night, she'll address any stranger who annoys her with a string of obscenities, she'll be aggressive and obnoxious as a lifestyle choice, and she will usually travel in packs. Her most public job is TV presenter of inane music programme, footballer's girlfriend, glamour-model-plus or radio DJ, but the hordes of imitators work in low-paid office jobs in the provinces and spend all their money going 'up west' at weekends. She commonly has a deep, loud voice and likes to use it. If you meet a pack in the street, it's best to get out of the way and as far as they are concerned the pavement belongs to them.

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  11. Ahem. Lulu. That was precise. xoxo

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  12. It was, wasn't it, M? I was just going to say, "It's a female 'lad', a 'blokeish woman'", but, wow!, that is good!

    SL, I think they deserve to be slapped not thanked: I know they're only reflecting what's actually happening but they don't have to perpetuate it.

    TLP, it would be quite good if they could 'deliver on the promise' - even for those of us whose past was never juicy, but, no, they can't, and yet we're 'worth it', aren't we? Oops, that's another company. LOL!

    L, what could you possibly be referring to, I wonder. ;-)

    K, if women refused to buy the products and insisted on not being either patronized or taken for fools, companies would have to mend their ways.

    T, I agree with you about 'juicy', but not about 'Youth Dew': they're both nice words and I find the combination pleasant too.

    You know now what a 'ladette' is. :-)

    I watch a lot of TV (always have). I believe British TV is still one of the best in the world. A lot of ads are very funny and stylish. Back in 1991, when I spent a few days in NYC, I was stunned by some of the ads I saw: they were so old-fashioned; they lacked style and imagination. I expect they're better now.

    You're a man, are you? Must go and see why. LOL!

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  13. No, I agree with Tania about Youth Dew. At least, I do now that she has put yukky ideas in my head...

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  14. I know, I know it is sooo not proper. Perpetuating all of those horrible behaviors...
    But can't you just imagine if we could erase it all? If we didn't have to wear the mistakes of youth on our adult faces...*sigh*
    I love the term Ladette, there is a test that is available which will determine whether you are a Ladette or a Lady. Go here (http://uk.tickle.com/test/ladette/start.html)

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  15. Well, I still like Youth Dew - juice (hee hee!) and the name.

    You'll have to forgive me, SL, you little devil's advocate you: I'm a 70s feminist; I don't understand why women would want to ape men, and ladettes hurt my aesthetic sense. The mistakes I made in my youth haven't left any mark on my face, which is just as well, considering how many marks there are already. LOL!

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  16. SL and Bela - do you hve a portrait of yourselves locked in a cupboard?

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  17. *FUN!* watching Lulu skate on thin ice during the Dorian Gray faceoff! (faceoff! get it? faceoff!) ♥ xoxo

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  18. On the wall disguised as a clock...
    Time is my friend

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  19. Ah, Dorian Gray... he and I are old acquaintances.LOL!

    SL, I've tried to make Time my friend, but I don't think He likes me. :-(

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